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The Gandhi Foundation Summer Gathering 2015

The Gandhi Foundation Summer Gathering 2015

Gandhian Values in the Digital Age

sg 2014

Saturday 25th July to Saturday 1st August 2015

at The Abbey, Sutton Courtenay, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 4AF

The Gandhi Foundation Summer Gathering 2015 will take as it’s focus Gandhian Values in the Digital, in a week of exploring community, nonviolence and creativity through sharing.

The Gandhi Foundation Summer Gathering 2011

The Gandhi Foundation Summer Gathering 2011

In the morning sessions we shall be looking at the dangers and opportunities of our increasing access to information technology.

There will be a variety of practical activities as well as walks, discussions etc.

Prices for the week range from £150 to £260 depending on the accommodation
– children and full-time students come at half price.

Come for the week, a few days or just a day. We look forward to seeing you.

For further information about the Summer Gathering 2015 and bookings contact: william@gandhifoundation.org

For information about The Abbey at Sutton Courtenay click here

For a review of the 2013 Summer Gathering click here

The Gandhi Foundation AGM 2015

cotton for my shroud

The Gandhi Foundation AGM will be on
Saturday 16th May 2015 at 2pm
at Kingsley Hall, Powis Road, Bromley-By-Bow, London E3 3HJ

Followed by the screening and discussion of Cotton for My Shroud – A film about farmer suicides in India and the culpability of the multinational Monsanto and the Indian Government. https://www.facebook.com/CottonForMyShroud

Please register with: william@gandhifoundation.org

‘Adivasi Campaign’ demands rejection of the Land Acquisition Ordinance 2014

Adivasi land rights

 

A letter from Gladson Dungdung, Convenor of Adivasi Campaign for Human Rights

 

On behalf of the “Adivasi Campaign for Human Rights”, I have the pleasure to share its first brief report, “Adivasi Campaign demands rejection of the Land Acquisition Ordinance, 2014″ which is available to view at:

http://www.adivasirights.org/full_news.php?news_id=2

The ‘Adivasi Campaign for Human Rights’ (Adivasi Campaign) has been recently established to lead the national campaign of the Adivasis/Indigenous Peoples of India, majority of whom, are notified as Scheduled Tribes under the Constitution of India.

In public domain in India, Adivasis/Indigenous Peoples are largely perceived either as victims or beneficiaries, but they are seldom considered as decision makers by government, non-governmental organizations, donors, international organisations etc. There is a serious lack of representation/participation of the Adivasis/indigenous peoples in the discussion, debate, policy formation, law making, budgeting, etc relating to them.

Therefore, it was decided to establish the ‘Adivasi Campaign for Human Rights’ with the aim to seek and ensure representation/participation of the Adivasis/Indigenous Peoples, among others, in discussion, debate, policy formation, law making and implementation of programmes relating to Adivasis/Indigenous Peoples by NGOs, donors, governments, UN bodies, etc.

The Adivasi Campaign is committed to promote, protect and ensure the rights of the Adivasis /Indigenous Peoples guaranteed under the Constitution of India and United Nations human rights instruments including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Gladson Dungdung

Convenor, Adivasi Campaign for Human Rights
Website: www.adivasirights.org

Dr Ursula King’s lecture from the Gandhi Foundation Multifaith Celebration

Ursula KIng

Ursula KIng

The Gandhi Foundation Multifaith Celebration was held on Saturday 31st January 2015 at the London Interfaith Centre. We were delighted to have Dr Ursula King from the University of Bristol giving our main lecture entitled ‘Caring for the Future of People and Planet – Religions, Ecology and Spirituality’. Dr Ursula King is Professor Emerita of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Bristol. She has lectured in many countries and has published on such subjects as religion & gender, interfaith dialogue, modern Hinduism, Christian mystics, and the French scientist and theologian Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.

You can read the full lecture by clicking in the link below:
CARING FOR THE FUTURE OF PEOPLE AND PLANET Religions, Ecology and Spirituality by Dr Ursula King

Help the Children of Gaza says Gandhi Foundation Patron Denis Halliday

smiles irish gaza

Going through some pictures from the recent weeks in Umm al Nasser, Northern Gaza.  Things are hard, very hard, for a lot of people in Gaza, in all of Palestine these days, but a child’s smile helps…. Although it was hard work, we (and obviously the children) had some fun… We decided the pictures, their smiles ought to be shared… Enjoy and remember to continue to help by donating.

-  Jenny and Derek Graham of Irish in Gaza

To donate: http://irishingaza.wordpress.com/donate-urgently-for-gaza/

For more information:  http://irishingaza.wordpress.com/

Human Stories and The East India Company – A unique project by Brick Lane Circle

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Are you interested in learning about how East India Company impacted on diverse people’s lives and how that changed over time?

 Do you want to write historical fictions based on facts about how Britain and Asia got connected?

 Do you want to improve your writing skills on heritage fiction writing?

 If the answers are yes then please come to the launch and find out more about the project and how you can join.

 Project Launch

6.30-8.30pm, Thursday, 19 March 2015

Lab 1A Idea Store Whitechapel, 321 Whitechapel Rd, London E1 1BU

Programme: Information on the project, short film on the East India Company, presentations from guests and experts, refreshments.

The London-based East India Company had a major impact on Asian and British lives for more than two centuries.

Twelve volunteer researchers will be recruited who will explore East India Company records and objects. They will discover important information about events, individuals and institutions linked to the work of the Company and write short fictional stories based on facts.

Possible topics for short story writing could include trading complexities; sea voyages and rough storms; Lascars in the East End; planning the opium wars; prosecution of criminals; experiences of warehouse workers; piracy on the Thames; receiving news of the Battle of Plassey; impacts  of eastern goods; migration to India and immigration into London; long distance romance; British ladies travelling to India to get married to British officers; institutional reforms; inter-racial relationship; experiences of racism, etc.

The project is being supported   by the London Metropolitan Archives, National Maritime Museum, Victoria & Albert Museum, British Library, Rich Mix Centre, Bow Drama Group and many community groups.

ALL WELCOME!

For further details and to book a place please contact Brick Lane Circle: bricklanecircle@yahoo.co.uk, 07914119282, www.bricklanecircle.org

 

Understanding the Ambedkar – Gandhi Debate By Rajmohan Gandhi

Dr B R Ambedkar in 1951

Dr B R Ambedkar in 1951

In 1936, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar was invited to deliver a lecture in Lahore – then very much part of India – by a Hindu group opposed to untouchability. When the group saw an advance text of the lecture, which was entitled Annihilation of Caste, they cancelled the invitation because towards the lecture’s end, the author had declared his intention of leaving the Hindu fold. In a riposte to the cancellation, Dr. Ambedkar published Annihilation of Caste. Its contents elicited an immediate comment from Gandhi in his journal, Harijan, to which Ambedkar issued a rejoinder.

A major text from India’s recent history, Annihilation of Caste has been republished many times and has been translated into several languages, often with the Ambedkar–Gandhi exchange added to the main text. In March 2014, a new edition was published in Delhi by Navayana. In this new edition, Annihilation of Caste is preceded by a 153-page text by Arundhati Roy, entitled ‘The Doctor and the Saint’, which is presented as an introduction to Ambedkar’s classic ‘undelivered’ lecture.

This little book is a response to Arundhati Roy’s ‘The Doctor and the Saint’. However, it also bears an indirect connection to the historic debate between Ambedkar and Gandhi, which took place during a period well removed from our times. While Gandhi’s assassination occurred nearly seven decades into the past, Ambedkar died in 1956, almost six decades ago.

The two were involved in a positive, if impersonal, relationship during the 1920s. Though they did not meet each other in this period, Ambedkar appreciated Gandhi’s concern for the plight of Dalits, and he also welcomed the method of satyagraha that Gandhi had introduced. However, the 1930s saw sharp, and from a historian’s standpoint revealing, exchanges between the two.

The exchanges help our understanding not only of two powerful individuals in history, but also of continuing flaws in Indian society and the tension in the first half of the twentieth century between the goals of national independence and social justice.

To read the full article click here: Independence and Social Justice – Jan 2015

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